Category Archives: Hylas 54

Fuel Tanks: Three Down One To Go

By Rich

Today we skipped what would have been great sailing weather to focus on getting the starboard forward tank cleaned out and its fuel lines replaced. Not ideal to give up a day of sailing but we need to get through our P1 projects before time runs out to get south! This tank had some of the worst debris and as it happens was the tank we were running off of when we killed the generator lift pump coming up from Charleston. Before and after photos:

More Sea Trialing

By Rich

One of our mandates for the fall before we head south to Lauderdale is to test the boat in any challenging conditions we can to find any leaks or other weaknesses. Last Saturday we had around 20 knots from the south, so Brian and I went out for some double handing. We found a leak or two and confirmed we need to tune the rig. Plus we had a blast!

Photo Credits: Wilbur Keyworth

Cruising Our Hometown and St. Michaels

By Rich

(Photos under sail credit to Lex B on s/v Acadia!)

We’ve been having a ball staying local for some daysailing and three weekends aboard. Two of those we enjoyed just picking up a mooring right in our own home town harbor! We enjoyed dingy rides in for takeout and then peaceful nights sleeping aboard during unseasonably cool and lovely nights.

Continue reading Cruising Our Hometown and St. Michaels

This Is Why We Need A Whisker Pole

By Rich

Here are two side by side videos that show why Rover needs a whisker pole, stat! Here’s a video from our 2015 ocean passage from Annapolis to Newport on the Sabre 42. With the jib poled out wing-on-wing we are able to point straight down the rhumb line with an ideal angle to the waves for surfing. Note also how limited the roll is. Even with the centerboard fully retracted, the square angle to the waves dramatically reduces roll, as do the higher speeds resulting from surfing:

Now here is a video from Rover this weekend with no whisker pole. Note that most of the jib has to be rolled up, because it’s blanketed by the main and was otherwise collapsing and re filling with a shuddering bang, while drawing only part of the time. Note that we had to steer higher angles to try to keep the scrap of jib drawing at all, and apart from taking us high of the rhumb line this higher angle means a less favorable angle to the waves for surfing. Worse still, it means a quartering sea that produces lots of roll. Not what we want!

Rover’s First Passage!

By Rich

Over the weekend Rover made her first ocean passage with us when we brought her home to Annapolis from Charleston, South Carolina! If this passage is any indication, we are going to get along incredibly well with this boat, because she exceeded our expectations in every way. Despite significantly throttling the boat down at various points (including an entire overnight flying only the main and staysail) we covered the 525 mile passage in 69 hours, for an average of 182 miles per day. Continue reading Rover’s First Passage!